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  • 03-28-2014, 09:25 PM
    VimyRidge
    A lot more hockey players seem to get concussions, but maybe we just don't hear about it in boxing/MMA if it is minor because they are not missing games a day later.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tongan.Death.Grip View Post
    Dehydration plays a massive part.

    But I still think boxing is by far more dangerous for the brain.

    Joints, bones and eyeballs? MMA hands down.
  • 03-28-2014, 06:16 PM
    Tongan.Death.Grip
    Dehydration plays a massive part.

    But I still think boxing is by far more dangerous for the brain.

    Joints, bones and eyeballs? MMA hands down.
  • 03-28-2014, 06:09 PM
    The Donosaur
    Quote Originally Posted by joeodd2 View Post
    They also look at the effects of punches landed on unconcious opponents. You mix those with years of extreme weight cuts and that could be a brain damage coctail.
    That sounds like a terrible, terrible drink.
  • 03-28-2014, 06:07 PM
    joeodd2
    Quote Originally Posted by XxChAoS32xX View Post
    So they concluded that MMA is harder on your brain than football and boxing, with scientific evidence such as score cards and videos. Give me a f**king break.

    Football players take repeated hits to the head often starting when they are in middle school and usually no later that high school, which means that the brain trauma that the players are receiving as KIDS happens while their brains are still developing, surely not helping things and likely making it worse. This also puts on another 6 to 11 years of punishment before they are even out of their early 20's and before they are even Pro.

    That is not the case in MMA, kids that practice MMA do not suffer from full blown KO's because it is not allowed. Only after you are 18 can you actually begin fighting without headgear, and I am guessing that, on average, most fighters probably aren't going to be able fight longer than 10 years (Here is an article on fighter career length).

    The studies on football related brain trauma are much more in-depth than "that player got hit really hard on his head, he must have suffered brain trauma" and "according to this injury report , this player has suffered from (x) amount of concussions over his career, he must have suffered (x) amount of brain damage". So it doesn't make sense to me that the researchers of thise study came to the conclusion that MMA is harder on a persons brain than football when their evidence is exactly what I just described, which is very unscientific, and even subjective, and the studies on football brain trauma are based on real scientific brain analysis.

    I am not saying that I don't believe that MMA could possibly worse on a persons brain than football. Based on some of the long term punishment I have witnessed some fighters absorb, I think MMA certainly could cause more brain damage than football, but before researchers start pushing that out as fact, I think that it is only right that actual scientific research is proof, not a bunch guys "looking at score cards and watching videos" as proof.

    All of that also applies to boxing as well.
    They also look at the effects of punches landed on unconcious opponents. You mix those with years of extreme weight cuts and that could be a brain damage coctail.
  • 03-28-2014, 12:33 AM
    XxChAoS32xX
    So they concluded that MMA is harder on your brain than football and boxing, with scientific evidence such as score cards and videos. Give me a f**king break.

    Football players take repeated hits to the head often starting when they are in middle school and usually no later that high school, which means that the brain trauma that the players are receiving as KIDS happens while their brains are still developing, surely not helping things and likely making it worse. This also puts on another 6 to 11 years of punishment before they are even out of their early 20's and before they are even Pro.

    That is not the case in MMA, kids that practice MMA do not suffer from full blown KO's because it is not allowed. Only after you are 18 can you actually begin fighting without headgear, and I am guessing that, on average, most fighters probably aren't going to be able fight longer than 10 years (Here is an article on fighter career length).

    The studies on football related brain trauma are much more in-depth than "that player got hit really hard on his head, he must have suffered brain trauma" and "according to this injury report , this player has suffered from (x) amount of concussions over his career, he must have suffered (x) amount of brain damage". So it doesn't make sense to me that the researchers of thise study came to the conclusion that MMA is harder on a persons brain than football when their evidence is exactly what I just described, which is very unscientific, and even subjective, and the studies on football brain trauma are based on real scientific brain analysis.

    I am not saying that I don't believe that MMA could possibly worse on a persons brain than football. Based on some of the long term punishment I have witnessed some fighters absorb, I think MMA certainly could cause more brain damage than football, but before researchers start pushing that out as fact, I think that it is only right that actual scientific research is proof, not a bunch guys "looking at score cards and watching videos" as proof.

    All of that also applies to boxing as well.
  • 03-27-2014, 10:31 PM
    VimyRidge
    Not sure what to make of that. Looks really bad but I have seen guys taking shots in the same position and come back hundreds of times and other fights that were stopped, guys getting up and complaining.

    Maybe most fights should be stopped a lot earlier. Example: Kongo/Berry. Kongo was pretty much out and came back to win, 29 times out of 30, a fighter rocked like that is not coming back from that. Even if they came back to win 50% of the time, is there some maximum level of damage that refs should use to stop a fight? Probably.

    I love MMA, favorite sport, but actually think it should be banned. Same with boxing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cat--Smasher View Post
    EFC Africa earlier today:
  • 03-27-2014, 09:03 PM
    Cat--Smasher
    EFC Africa earlier today:
  • 03-27-2014, 08:57 PM
    IceCold48
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. MMA View Post
    What were your findings based on though?



    I see what you mean but I disagree with the statement that people know it has a high trauma rate. It seems intuitive but when you have Dana constantly bullshitting the public that it is the safest sport in the world based on acute injuries instead of long-term chronic issues, it presents a false message. Also, I think that bringing issues of injuries/safety/trauma/etc can help create regulations or rules to make the sport safer without necessarily taking anything significant from MMA.

    We have seen this in the MMA itself in its short history with rules being implemented such as referees being able to stop the fight, certain strikes being considered as fouls (back of the head, groin, eye gouges), etc. These all took place to increase the safety and it did not jeopardize what we enjoy about MMA. In hockey, mandatory helmets caused a public outcry a few decades ago and right now, it's the norm. It didn't take away from the action. In MMA, in my opinion, weight cutting regulations will surely be implemented in years to come. Perhaps, moving to 6oz gloves instead of 4oz is another step. Pride used 6oz gloves and that didn't affect the action at all. There is still room in MMA to increase its safety.
    I'll try to find it and send you the sources as a PM, not sure if I'll find it because it was like four or five eyars ago but I might
  • 03-27-2014, 08:36 PM
    joeodd2
    I've been saying this for years. Those extra shots fighters deliver to knocked out opponents hurts the sport and the fighters. I get that they are told to keep fighting until the Ref says stop, but I applaud those like Mark Hunt who have the decipline not to try to beat a knocked out opponent's brains in just because he can. It turns my stomach to see guys do that, The first Silva/Wiedman fight was a perfect example, you can't tell me Wiedman thought Anderson wasn't out, he punched him because he could. Hendo vs Bisping was another, although I will admit I did derive some savage joy from that, what Hendo did hurt the sport more than it hurt Bisping that night. I hear the argument, well you can't take the chance that they are not out....that's just a weak excuse. If they are not out, so be it.

    Honor should be more important than winning a fight. There is no honor in beating a limp defenseless man's brains in just because the Ref is 2 or 3 seconds late stopping you from doing so...But we don't award Honor do we? Maybe that's a huge part of the problem. I'd like to see more martial artist show what it means to be TRUE martial artists and not just "fighters". That's when we will see this sport get to the next level. It's just a matter of time before someone dies from those extra shots inside a UFC cage. Then what?
  • 03-27-2014, 06:42 PM
    rahdeezy
    Quote Originally Posted by The Donosaur View Post
    I'm no doctor, and probably not even particularly smart, but I didn't need a study to show me that a sport in which post knockdown strikes happen, has a high trauma rate. That's the thing though, it is what it is, it's violent by its very nature. If you change it's basic construct, then it isn't what it used to be, it isn't MMA. Do studies, get people informed, protect yourself as a company, but remain true to what you are. People choose to fight. People choose to play football. People choose to play all of these sports. Knowing the dangers would make some avoid entering the sport, but the reality is that most would take the risk for the money, fame, love of the sport, ect.. Let's not kid anyone, when business starts to suffer due to changing things, things will stop changing real fast. I love MMA. I don't want to see anyone get seriously hurt, but that is the risk involved. It is inherently part of what MMA is. I wouldn't want anyone to be forced to do it, but I'll watch 2 people fight under their own free will, every time.

    I wanna go on a big rant about how people are free to drive fast cars, and eat shitty food, because people have the freedom to do what they want, but I'm barely functional from being smack dab in the middle of working 28 hours in a 36 hour period, and I feel like my rant makes little sense as it is.

    I would very much so like to see Bisping take another 1.6 shots.
    You pretty much read my mind. It is the nature of the beast. These are grown ass men who know what they're signing up for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. MMA View Post
    I see what you mean but I disagree with the statement that people know it has a high trauma rate. It seems intuitive but when you have Dana constantly bullshitting the public that it is the safest sport in the world based on acute injuries instead of long-term chronic issues, it presents a false message. Also, I think that bringing issues of injuries/safety/trauma/etc can help create regulations or rules to make the sport safer without necessarily taking anything significant from MMA.

    We have seen this in the MMA itself in its short history with rules being implemented such as referees being able to stop the fight, certain strikes being considered as fouls (back of the head, groin, eye gouges), etc. These all took place to increase the safety and it did not jeopardize what we enjoy about MMA. In hockey, mandatory helmets caused a public outcry a few decades ago and right now, it's the norm. It didn't take away from the action. In MMA, in my opinion, weight cutting regulations will surely be implemented in years to come. Perhaps, moving to 6oz gloves instead of 4oz is another step. Pride used 6oz gloves and that didn't affect the action at all. There is still room in MMA to increase its safety.
    I'm sure there is some type of awareness regarding the trauma rate when someone agrees to engage in hand to hand combat for a company that has the name "ultimate fighting".
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