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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • 10-01-2006, 03:47 AM
    Jagman
    First off, you would not have to be juiced to complete this workout. Some of you forget that leading up to a fight training is a fighter's ONLY job. Wake, up train, eat, rest, train, eat rest, etc...... While this type of regimen may be hard for some of us who have day jobs, it is not far fetched for a pro athlete to train like this. Some of you should have seen Randy Couture's workout protocol and nutrtional/ supplement plan. His was one of the most in depth and intense plans I have seen.

    I work as a full-time strength coach for a university, and a part-time assistant strength coach for an NFL team and can say for sure that during certain times of year, my players training protocols look very similar in both style and volume to what Matt (and many other fighters as well) is doing. He is essentially doing a form of volume training. Doing this type of training for 8-12 weeks at a time would not lead to overtraining or diminishing returns IF one is taking in enough calories to promote recovery, and one is getting plenty of rest. Clearly Matt gets plenty of rest as he has nothing else to do but train. Therefore, he can nap or eat whenever he chooses, on whatever schedule he chooses that works for him. After the fight Matt has also stated he takes about 2 months or so off from that regimen to give his body a rest. During this recovery period he said he does single set circuit training 2 days a week, and limits his cardiovascular work to 3 days per week. So a protocol of 3 months max effort then 2 months recovery is pretty sensible.

    Also, it is not all that surprising to see that he doesn't have a heavy focus on compound or multi-joint movements. I say this because more and more professional sport franchises are going away from those as well due to the high risk reward associated with them. While these exercise do have value, they are also very hard on your joints and carry the largest risk of injury as well due to the nature of the exercise (this correlation between these movements and injury is shown in multiple sports medicine journals). Now-a-days these athletes make so much money that the last thing they want to do, or the coaches want to do, is risk their health on their workouts. So avoiding these movements can be a smart precaution. Especially considering they can get nearly the same results without these movements by doing more stable exercises if they use the proper progression from workout to workout.
  • 09-30-2006, 09:55 PM
    EolGul
    Forget Jesus, forget Xyience. Matt's true strength lies in the country breakfast.
  • 09-30-2006, 07:22 PM
    AudieMurphy1
    this use to be my routine

    (every other day)
    5 sets of 50 push ups as fast as possible(alternating weeks of regular triangle and wide)
    5 sets of 30 situps as fast as possible
    3 sets of 30 crunches
    3 sets of 100 scissor kicks, military count
    3 sets of 30 pull ups
    3 sets of 20 backlifts
    3 sets of 20 back pulls
    3 sets of 50 lundges
    shadow boxing
    punching bag
    my catas(sp?)
    sparring
    2-3 mile run as fast as possible
    swim

    (the other days)
    stretching
    catas
    shadow boxing
    sparring
    punching bag
    sparring

    sunday= no workout

    once a month i would switch to a heavy wieght lifting regiment consisting of bench, curls tricepts ect.

    and every three months take a week off, i'm probably forgetting some stuff but you get the idea, by the way, that muscle milk stuff is really good stuff
  • 09-30-2006, 07:14 PM
    Ubermensch
    Quote Originally Posted by Clint
    I prefer a lower reps for my weight training (Although at the moment I'm doing mostly complexes for weight loss)
    Most people do I have just found that it works for me. I build Better muscle that way and I like to be quick because I already have heavy hands...
  • 09-30-2006, 07:00 PM
    Clint
    Quote Originally Posted by Ubermensch
    On the Cardio issue....a long time ago I got a Bas Rutten workout that came with some Really cool audio tapes of him doing what my Muai Thai trainer use to do when we did pad work. So I what I do is I jump rope for about 15 min and then go into the tapes thats a combo of Sprawls, Knees, Punches, Mountain Climbers(for Shoots) and Kicks. Obviously there are diffrent combos and you can do either bag work or shadow boxing. But the point is I never get board with it there are 8 diffrent routines on his tapes. IT IS A CARDIO WORK OUT...So don't think it will teach you how to fight unless you have had some instruction. But anyway I like cardio because of it and never did in the past.

    Oh and I like to do 3 sets of 20rep 4 exercises per musscle group on my lifts so I am more exposive Similar regime thoug not as intense as his. I load HDT afterwards with some Amino's
    I prefer a lower reps for my weight training (Although at the moment I'm doing mostly complexes for weight loss)

    Although I have to agree, anyone that wants a solid cardio routine buy the Bas Rutten CDs. They come with a book and video that show you how to use them and then 4 CDs: Boxing, Thaiboxing, Overall Fighting, and Overall Workout and those CDs will kick you ass.
  • 09-30-2006, 06:42 PM
    Ubermensch
    On the Cardio issue....a long time ago I got a Bas Rutten workout that came with some Really cool audio tapes of him doing what my Muai Thai trainer use to do when we did pad work. So I what I do is I jump rope for about 15 min and then go into the tapes thats a combo of Sprawls, Knees, Punches, Mountain Climbers(for Shoots) and Kicks. Obviously there are diffrent combos and you can do either bag work or shadow boxing. But the point is I never get board with it there are 8 diffrent routines on his tapes. IT IS A CARDIO WORK OUT...So don't think it will teach you how to fight unless you have had some instruction. But anyway I like cardio because of it and never did in the past.

    Oh and I like to do 3 sets of 20rep 4 exercises per musscle group on my lifts so I am more exposive Similar regime thoug not as intense as his. I load HDT afterwards with some Amino's
  • 09-30-2006, 04:31 PM
    Hypergit
    Quote Originally Posted by Boo
    After just looking at the cardio, it looks reasonable to me. I'm comparing it to what I did at his age. I did 45 min of cardio 4 days a week.

    It seems you don't think it's the cardio. Correct?
    The cardio is fine. Although he does very little anaerobic training, this would probably be covered ok in the sparring and weight training. There are a lot of things about his workout I don't like though, and some practices that seem sub-optimal or even catabolic.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boo
    I don't know the term "pyramids", are you referring to different exercises per body part? Please clarify.
    1st: 15 reps
    2nd: 10-12 reps
    3rd: no more than 6
    4th: 10-12

    The first three sets here are a pyramid - reducing the reps, increasing the weight. You can do reverse pyramids too, which are the other way around, and you can put the two together like Matt is doing here. Bodybuilding nonsence if you ask me. I like medium pyramids to warm up for work sets, but I'm not sure what Matt is going for here. It doesn't look good for strength, mass, or muscular endurance - he must be looking at improving his LA tollerance and simply maintaining strength whilst improving his fitness.

    As Clint mentioned, though, he should probably be doing compound movements almost exclusively and working the arms is not necessary. He is badly overtraining unless he is roided or is only doing it for a couple of weeks imo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint
    Also, I wonder why he is using the Muscle Milk Postworkout. That seems suboptimal since Muscle Milk is mostly casein which takes around 6 hours to digest
    I don't believe this - I think he is being paid to say it. However, it's interesting that he waits a full hour after his weight session to drink it...

    git.
  • 09-30-2006, 04:17 PM
    Dominus
    It all depends what kind of work his does on the farm every day. He works for three hours on the farm in the morning, depending on his work load he probably does enough lifting and raking and bailing and other stuff to keep his arms strong. He's probably been working his ass off since he was a little kid. Over years of work he would have built plenty of arm strength and muscle mass. I doubt is a conspiracy.
  • 09-30-2006, 03:49 PM
    Clint
    Also, I wonder why he is using the Muscle Milk Postworkout. That seems suboptimal since Muscle Milk is mostly casein which takes around 6 hours to digest and during the PWO window your body needs amino acids quickly. I would think that something like a Dextrose/Whey combination at a 2:1 ratio would be better for muscle recovery/catabolism prevention and then take the Muscle Milk (I'm sure he takes it because it provides alot of calories) later in the day or before bed to feed your muscle through the night. Admittably the difference is probably small in comparing the two but as a pro fighter any small improvement helps.

    Anyone else use Muscle Milk postworkout? Do you find that it helps your recovery more than Whey?
  • 09-30-2006, 03:39 PM
    Clint
    Quote Originally Posted by ArMnHC
    im a personal trainer, and there is no way he could get a great arm workout on all those days unless he used arm exercises as active recovery between exercises for his other body parts, or did a day solely arms. and Matt is shredded all over, so he has to do one or the other. im guessing he does arms between other exercises. but his workout is pretty intense, but he probably has people there to either motivate him or workout with him cuz almost anyone couldn't do that kind of workout without some motivation.
    Hughes shouldn't need to do a specific arm workout. The pushing exercises will work his triceps and the pulling exercises (Back day) will work his biceps. The fact that he is shredded is a bodyfat issue.

    I never expected to say this but I don't like that routine (I realize it works for him and he should keep doing what he is doing though). Considering how strong Hughes is, I would expect more or a Push/Pull/Squat routine with large compound movements, as that is better suited for strength.

    Although, I think he is more aiming for Muscular endurance and just maintaining his current strength. The Set/Rep Numbers look very much like German Body Composition training which is superb for increasing your lactic acid threshold and causing your body to release more growth hormones which would aide in recovery/body compositing/etc. So knowing that he is already freakishly strong, it just makes sense for him to work his muscle endurance, since it's more important anyways.
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