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  • 07-04-2006, 10:41 PM
    TheTruth
    I remember my infamous battle with Cuadros about the "Bruce Lee argument". That was epic.
  • 07-03-2006, 07:32 PM
    sempaiman
    Quote Originally Posted by fe4tw
    Bruce was credited with creating JKD, an anti-style of fighting. I have no idea what you mean by saying he was credited for creating "a contact karate style basically", I've never heard about that. And it doesn't make any sense, because obviously contact fighting has existed for ages.

    I have no clue about those WW2 people, so I can't comment on that.
    I go it now, "....using anti-style as a style; using no-way as a way,..."

    You should look up those guys, you might find it interesting.
  • 07-03-2006, 06:55 PM
    fe4tw
    Bruce was credited with creating JKD, an anti-style of fighting. I have no idea what you mean by saying he was credited for creating "a contact karate style basically", I've never heard about that. And it doesn't make any sense, because obviously contact fighting has existed for ages.

    I have no clue about those WW2 people, so I can't comment on that.
  • 07-03-2006, 05:50 PM
    sempaiman
    Quote Originally Posted by fe4tw
    I'll correct you. Bruce Lee's JKD was to do ANYTHING that worked, ground, standup, whatever. Thai Boxing doesn't work ground from what I know.
    My point is that contact fighting was already around in a Martial Art. Karate and Kung-Fu did non-contact sparring. Lee was credited for creating a contact karate style basically. That wasn't anything new. World War 2 military trainers such as William Fairbairn, Rex Applegate and others devised close-quaters hand-to-hand fighting systems that used anything that worked.
  • 07-03-2006, 03:41 AM
    fe4tw
    Quote Originally Posted by sempaiman
    Let me see...Bruce Lee is a genious because he came up with Jeet Kune Do - Full Contact fighting - correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Thai Boxing around already (using elbows, knees, punches, kicks, and stand up grappling). Oh yeah, Thai Boxing did not have the finger jab in the eyes. Yeah, sounds genious to me......
    I'll correct you. Bruce Lee's JKD was to do ANYTHING that worked, ground, standup, whatever. Thai Boxing doesn't work ground from what I know.
  • 07-01-2006, 09:21 PM
    sempaiman

    Bruce Lee genious......yeah

    Let me see...Bruce Lee is a genious because he came up with Jeet Kune Do - Full Contact fighting - correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Thai Boxing around already (using elbows, knees, punches, kicks, and stand up grappling). Oh yeah, Thai Boxing did not have the finger jab in the eyes. Yeah, sounds genious to me......
  • 07-01-2006, 05:57 PM
    Legend
    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxer
    The reality is that Bruce Lee back then vs a top guy right now, the probability is that Bruce Lee would lose. But, if BL was given time to train, he would reinvent himself again. With that being said, he'd have just as good a shot as anybody at being a champion. BL continued to reinvent himself, he never felt he knew enough. With that attitude and his physical endurance/strength, he could very well be a champ.
    Yeah agreed. If Lee were given a chance to study and train for MMA im sure he could adapt his style to be successful. But yeah just throw him in there with a top guy with no training for it and hes going to get killed. Just because hes a legend and has this mythical legacy doesent mean he wouldnt get his ass handed to him.
  • 07-01-2006, 05:46 PM
    Thaiboxer
    Quote Originally Posted by killerinstinct
    agreed.

    BTW man sounds like you've had a rough life by reading your signature. Why nothing postive in there?
    all those things in my signature are common today. doesnt mean ive had any rougher of a life than the next guy.

    there is a positive. step into the cage with me, ha
  • 07-01-2006, 03:48 PM
    TapOut27

    Bruce Lee's feats

    Bruce Lee's two finger push upsBruce Lee's striking speed from 2 feet away was five hundredths of a second. (Glover[10])
    Bruce did one-hand push ups using only 2 fingers.
    Bruce was able to break a 150lb bag with a sidekick. (Coburn[10])
    Bruce would ride for 45 minutes (10 Miles) on a stationary bike, sweating profusely afterwards. (Uhera [10])
    Bruce's last movie Enter the Dragon was made for US$850,000 in 1973 ($3.74 million in 2005 currency. BLS[11]). To date, Enter the Dragon has grossed over $100,000,000. (IMDB.com[12])
    Bruce was able to hold a 125-pound barbell at arms length in front of him (with elbows locked) for several seconds. (Little[13])
    Bruce Lee weighed 128 pounds at the time of his death and was 5 feet 7 inches tall.
    [edit]
    Quotes from Bruce Lee's friends
    These are some quotes from Bruce Lee's students and people who trained with him about his feats of strength:[10]

    Chuck Norris
    "Lee, pound for pound, might well have been one of the strongest men in the world, and certainly one of the quickest."
    Doug Palmer
    "Bruce was like the Michael Jordan or Muhammad Ali in his prime, somebody who stood above everyone else. It's not that the other martial artists weren't good. It's just that this guy was great."
    Herb Jackson
    "The biggest problem in designing equipment for Bruce was that he'd go through it so damn fast. I had to reinforce his wooden dummy with automobile parts so he could train on it without breaking it. I had started to build him a mobile dummy that could actually attack and retreat to better simulate "live" combat, sadly Bruce died before the machine was built. It would have been strung up by big high-tension cables that I was going to connect between two posts, one on either side of his backyard. The reason for the machine was simply because no one could stand up to his full force punches and kicks, Bruce's strength and skill had evolved to a point where he had to fight machines."
    "He never trained in a gym, he thought he could concentrate better at home, so he worked out on his patio. He had a small weight set, something like a standard 100lb cast-iron set. In addition, he had a 310lb Olympic barbell set, a bench press and some dumbbells, both solid and adjustable."
    "Bruce used to beat all other comers at this type of wrist wrestling and even joked that he wanted to be world champion at it."
    James Coburn
    "Bruce and I were training out on my patio one day, we were using this giant bag for side kicks, I guess it weighed about 150lbs. Bruce looked at it and just went Bang, it shot up out into the lawn about 15ft in the air, it then busted in the middle. It was filled with little bits and pieces of rag, we were picking up bits of rag for months."
    Jesse Glover
    "When he could do push ups on his thumbs and push ups with 250lbs on his back, he moved on to other exercises."
    "The power that Lee was capable of instantly generating was absolutely frightening to his fellow martial artists, especially his sparring partners, and his speed was equally intimidating. We timed him with an electric timer once, and Bruce's quickest movements were around five hundredths of a second, his slowest were around eight hundredths. This was punching from a relaxed position with his hands down at his sides from a distance between 18-24 inches. Not only was he amazingly quick, but he could read you too. He could pick up on small subtle things that you were getting ready to do and then he'd just shut you down."
    "Bruce was gravitating more and more toward weight training as he would use the weighted wall pulleys and do series upon series with them. He'd also grab one of the old rusty barbells that littered the floor at the YMCA and would roll it up and down his forearms, which is no small feat when you consider that the barbell weighed 70lbs."
    Jim Kelly
    "Bruce, well I can basically say this. I have been around a lot of great martial arts fighters. Worked out with them. Fought them in tournaments. In my opinion Bruce Lee was the greatest martial artist who ever lived. To me thats my opinion. I think Bruce Lee is the greatest martial artist ever. I don't think anybody is in his class."
    Joe Lewis
    "Bruce was incredibly strong for his size. He could take a 75lb barbell and from a standing position with the barbell held flush against his chest, he could slowly stick his arms out, lock them and hold the barbell there for 20 seconds, that's pretty damn tough for a guy who at the time only weighed 138lbs. I know 200lb weight lifters who can't do that."
    " I never stood in front of another human who was as quick as him. He not only had the quickness but he had the inner confidence to muster the conviction to do so. I've seen others who had the speed but lack conviction or vice versa. He was like Ali, he had both. I stood before both of these men, so I know."
    "If Bruce Lee wasn´t the greatest martial artist of all time, then certainly he is the number one candidate." (Source)
    Leo Fong
    "Yes, I was on the receiving end of his side kick. It was like getting hit with a truck."
    Mito Uhera
    "Bruce always felt that if your stomach wasn't developed, then you had no business doing any hard sparring."
    James Rage
    "I think its important for people to realize that he was not only one of history's greatest martial artists, but also one of the finest athletes period. His devotion to physical exercise and healthy lifestyle was mind-boggling."
  • 07-01-2006, 03:47 PM
    TapOut27
    Bruce Lee would have completly dominated if he was training for MMA. His weight might be the only issue, as he weighed 125-135lbs, but he is quoted as beeing p4p the strongest man alive.
    Taken from wikipedia.com

    Jeet Kune Do
    Main article: Jeet Kune Do

    The Jeet Kune Do Emblem. The Chinese characters around the Taijitu symbol indicate: "Using no way as way" & "Having no limitation as limitation" The arrows represent the endless movement and change of the universe.Bruce Lee believed that martial arts styles were limited by their very nature. Instead, he emphasized what he called "the style of no style". This consisted of utilizing a non-formalized approach which Lee claimed was not indicative of traditional styles. Lee named his martial arts system Jun Fan Gung Fu, which consisted mostly of elements of Wing Chun, with elements of Western Boxing, Fencing, and other martial arts. Lee later expanded his personal system over time, to include elements from Indo-Malay Silat, Panantukan, Sikaran, Catch Wrestling, Karate, Judo, Jujitsu, Taekwondo, and other martial arts. Eventually Jun Fan Gung Fu transformed itself to what he would come to describe as Jeet Kune Do or the Way of the Intercepting Fist, a term he would later regret because Jeet Kune Do implied specific parameters that styles connotate whereas the whole point of the system was to exist outside of parameters and limitations. Some confuse the Jeet Kune Do system with the personal version that Bruce Lee practised. Jeet Kune Do can be seen as both a process and a product, the latter deriving from the former.

    Lee claimed that, after arriving in San Francisco, his theories about martial arts and his teaching of "secret" Chinese martial arts to non-Asian students gave him enemies in the martial arts community. A contest was scheduled between him and Wong Jack Man, a practitioner of Northern Shaolin Kung fu.

    Bruce Lee's description of the fight was that Wong Jack Man challenged him to a duel over his decision to teach non-Chinese students. Bruce Lee accepted the challenge. Many who witnessed the fight believed Lee had won the duel, however Wong disputes this. Lee later took the view that the fight took "too long" because traditional martial arts techniques were too rigid and formalistic to be practical in scenarios of chaotic street fighting. Perhaps as a result of this fight, he decided to develop a system with an emphasis on "practicality, flexibilty, speed, and efficiency".

    Wong's version of the story suggested that he had only challenged Bruce Lee after Lee sent out a challenge to all martial artists in San Francisco. However, Lee did not agree with this account. The numbers of people who attended the fight ranged from 8 to 13[6]. Wong and another attendee, William Chen, remembered the fight as being more than 20 minutes, and that Wong was on the defensive and Lee was the aggressor. Bruce Lee's description said that he had chased Wong around the room until finally subduing him. Wong later published his own view on the outcome of the fight in the Chinese Pacific Weekly newspaper and an invitation to Lee for a public rematch. Lee, however, did not publically respond to Wong's invitation for unknown reasons. [6]

    [edit]
    Beyond Jeet Kune Do
    The match with Wong influenced Lee's philosophy on fighting. Lee believed that the fight had lasted too long and that he had failed to live up to his potential. At this point he decided to start different methods of training such as weight training for strength, running for endurance, stretching for flexibility, and many others which he constantly adapted.

    During this time Lee developed his own combat techniques, also demonstrating the infamous one inch punch, of Wing Chun, during a Karate tournament at Long Beach and performed repetitions of two-finger pushups (using the thumb and the index finger).

    Bruce Lee certified three instructors: Dan Inosanto, Taky Kimura, and James Yimm Lee (no relation to Bruce Lee). James Yimm Lee, a close friend of Bruce Lee, died without certifying additional students. Taky Kimura, to date, has certified one person in Jun Fan Gung Fu: his son and heir Andy Kimura. All other instructors are certified under Dan Inosanto. Prior to his death, Lee told his then only two living instructors Inosanto and Kimura (James Yimm Lee had died in 1972.) to dismantle his schools. Both Taky Kimura and Dan Inosanto were allowed to teach small classes thereafter without using name the Jeet Kune Do. Lee specifically said to Inosanto "Keep the numbers small and the quality high".

    As a result of a lawsuit between the estate of Bruce Lee (a.k.a. Concord Moon) and the Inosanto Academy, the name "Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do" was legally trademarked, and the rights were given solely to the Lee estate. "The name is made up of two parts: 'Jun Fan' (Bruce’s given Chinese name) and 'Jeet Kune Do' (the Way of the Intercepting Fist). The development of Bruce Lee’s art from 1961 until the end of his life was one smooth and indivisible path. In the beginning, he referred to his teachings simply as Jun Fan Gung Fu. Later he further refined his art as a unique Gung fu all its own – Jeet Kune Do" (from the Bruce Lee Foundation Web site).

    Some martial arts instructors, in an effort to promote themselves or their martial arts schools, make dubious claims about learning from or teaching Bruce Lee. There are only a few living people who can trace their lineage directly to Bruce Lee.

    [edit]
    1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships

    Bruce Lee's "One inch punch"At the invitation of Ed Parker, Lee appeared in the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championship and performed repetitions of two-finger pushups (using the thumb and the index finger) with feet at approximately a shoulder-width apart. In the same Long Beach event he also performed the "One inch punch". The description of which is as follows: Lee stood upright, his right foot forward with knees bent slightly, in front of a standing, stationary partner. Lee's right arm was partly extended and his right fist approximately an inch away from the partner's chest. Without retracting his right arm, Lee then forcibly delivered the punch to his partner while largely maintaining his posture, sending the partner backwards and falling into a chair placed behind the partner to prevent injury, though the force of the impact caused his partner to soon after fall onto the floor.

    [edit]
    Physical fitness and nutrition

    Lee flexing (1972), frontBruce Lee felt that many martial artists of his day did not spend enough time on physical conditioning. Bruce did not resort to traditional bodybuilding techniques to build mass; he was more interested in speed and power.

    The weight training program that Lee used during a stay in Hong Kong in 1965 indicated bicep curls of eighty pounds and eight repetitions[7] for endurance. This translates to an estimated one repetition maximum of 110 pounds, [8] placing Lee in approximately the 100th percentile for the 121 to 140 pound weight class.[9]

    Lee believed that the abdominal muscles were one of the most important muscle groups for a martial artist, since virtually every movement requires some degree of abdominal work. Perhaps more importantly, the "abs" are like a shell, protecting the ribs and vital organs. Bruce Lee's washboard abs did not come from mere abdominal training; he was also a proponent of cardiovascular conditioning and would regularly run, jump rope, and ride a stationary bicycle. A typical exercise for Lee would be to run a distance of two to six miles in fifteen to forty-five minutes.

    Another element in Bruce Lee's quest for abdominal definition was nutrition. According to Linda Lee, soon after he moved to the United States, Bruce started to take nutrition seriously and developed an interest in health foods and high-protein drinks. He ate lean meat sparingly and consumed large amounts of fruits and vegetables.

    [edit]
    Bruce Lee's feats

    Bruce Lee's two finger push upsBruce Lee's striking speed from 2 feet away was five hundredths of a second. (Glover[10])
    Bruce did one-hand push ups using only 2 fingers.
    Bruce was able to break a 150lb bag with a sidekick. (Coburn[10])
    Bruce was able to hold a 125-pound barbell at arms length in front of him (with elbows locked) for several seconds. (Little[13])
    Bruce Lee weighed 128 pounds at the time of his death and was 5 feet 7 inches tall.

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