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  • 11-26-2012, 04:31 PM
    Sniggles
    I'd like to see more frequent testing but it's not going to be ever be imployed due to pushing money outwards from commissions rather than inwards.
  • 11-26-2012, 03:57 PM
    Cat--Smasher
    Dong Hyun Kim says 90% of UFC fighters are on performance enhancing drugs
    While a lot of people believe doping tests work, just like a breathalyzer test you can get away with it by just controlling timing. Most of the steroids user just cycle and get by the tests. It’s almost like other athletes look down on you as an idiot if you don’t do steroids. It's like non-users are bicyclists while steroid users are racing with motorcycles. But I am one of those “idiots” that don’t use performance enhancers. I would say 90% of UFC fighters use performance enhancers.

    *And another vote for 90%
  • 10-22-2012, 02:57 PM
    Fe1
    Not like he's naming names.
  • 10-22-2012, 02:44 PM
    bingo
    Quote Originally Posted by dbader08 View Post
    Mac is probably just trying to convince himself and others that it's that high to make himself feel better about the fact that he will never be a top contender.
    LOL, probably so. Most everyone knows that a percentage of fighters or professional athletes use PEDs. However, does anyone else feel like he's kind of like a jailhouse snitch?
  • 10-21-2012, 06:44 PM
    Kimbo> Rampage
    "I talk to a lot of athletes out there about who's doing what," Conte said in June. "They're frank with me, partly because it's a two-way street. Give an example: One of the top MMA training centers in Northern California that has a number of UFC fighters, and I asked the owner of the facility and the head trainer what percentage of his athletes – the 16 UFC athletes that he had – were using drugs because he was asking me to help some of his athletes, and I said, 'Well, I can't help athletes that are using drugs.'
    Well no shit... if they were already on Drugs how was he supposed to help them out...

    That guy got busted for a pretty big operation...
  • 10-21-2012, 06:44 PM
    Cat--Smasher
    Tom Lawlor: Why I don't use PEDs - Mixed Martial Arts News

    From: Tom Lawlor
    Posted: 7 hours ago
    Member Since: 1/1/01
    Posts: 4948

    FRAT warning:

    This is a hot button topic in the MMA world in the past few years, and with Conte recently saying that 50% of fighters use PED's it has been brought back up. Not to mention the drama surrounding Carwin/Nelson, numerous failed drug tests, TRT fiascos,etc. Personally I believe the number to be higher than 50% of fighters taking something during the year, whether after fights to help the body recover from weeks and weeks of abuse, using during camps and finding ways around testing positive, or whatever the case may be. I'm not basing my thoughts on just UFC guys, but people over all levels of professional fighting, hell the UFC #'s might be lower than the overall % due to the testing procedures. However as for myself:

    Quite frankly, it isn't worth it to me on various levels:

    1) This is probably the sentiment most echo'd by guys who don't use PEDs, but I don't want to regret it when I am older and done with my career. I don't want to spend the rest of my life second guessing my abilities and successes, wondering if it is due to some outside advantage of factor that I didn't intrisically have.

    2)The fine/penalties are too great for me in my career at this time. Sure if I was bringing home bags of cash like it has been reported some guys in Pride did, then the temptation would be greater. For me, being suspended for a year or having a large fine issued to me would be damaging to my life on a day to day basis as I live off of basicaly just my fighter purses. Take my ability to work away, and I'm in trouble financially.

    3)I hate needles and don't want to take the time to do all of the scientific study to make using PED's not be a detriment to my health.

    4) The "brand" of being labeled a user. Once you have been busted for steroids/etc, it will follow you your entire career. Fans are quick to forget your successess but very eager to bring up past failures in many cases, especially regarding the use of drugs.

    I understand why people take them, I really do. The ability to improve on a daily basis physically is very appealing, and various PED's aid in recovery/muscle building/fat loss/etc, and can not only allow you to improve your skillset at a faster rate but also make you more marketable due to looks. If you are a top level guy and the difference between your show money and your win + show is $40k or so, then things start to look differently. It is inherently easier to continue to gain wealth WITH wealth, and a huge lump sum of $ can go a long way in buying homes, vehicles, starting business, retirement funds,etc. Whereas myself, it hasn't been worth the extra $8-$12k I could have possibly received by using and giving myself a "better" chance of winning. Throw a title on the line? The drive and desire to continue to be at the pinnacle of the sport may allow someone to convince themselves that a PED is a viable option in their career.

    Me? I'll stick with trying to win fights and get fight bonuses, while training my ass off in the gym, going home and being sore and exhausted. I'd rather be in my current position of 4-3 Tom Lawlor in the UFC than be 7-0 UberLawlor and relying on something other than my own guts, intelligence (or lack of), and hard work.
  • 10-21-2012, 02:54 PM
    W.Silva>C.Norris
    thats actually what made me think about this..
  • 10-21-2012, 01:59 PM
    Sniggles
    Quote Originally Posted by W.Silva>C.Norris View Post


    hmm... I wonder...
    Jake Shields just got busted.
  • 10-21-2012, 01:11 PM
    W.Silva>C.Norris
    "I talk to a lot of athletes out there about who's doing what," Conte said in June. "They're frank with me, partly because it's a two-way street. Give an example: One of the top MMA training centers in Northern California that has a number of UFC fighters, and I asked the owner of the facility and the head trainer what percentage of his athletes – the 16 UFC athletes that he had – were using drugs because he was asking me to help some of his athletes, and I said, 'Well, I can't help athletes that are using drugs.'


    hmm... I wonder...
  • 10-21-2012, 04:44 AM
    Cat--Smasher
    Former BALCO boss Victor Conte estimates 50 percent of MMA fighters using PEDs | MMAjunkie.com

    Former doping specialist turned anti-doping crusader Victor Conte has a potentially sobering view of mixed martial arts.

    During a recent appearance on UFC broadcaster Joe Rogan's popular podcast, "The Joe Rogan Experience," Conte said he estimates around half of all current MMA fighters are using some type of performance-enhancing drug.

    "From total of all performance-enhancing drugs, it's in the neighborhood of 50 percent," Conte told Rogan.

    By now, Conte's checkered past has been well-documented. As the founder and former president of California's Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), Conte in 2005 was convicted of conspiracy to distribute steroids and money laundering. Working with chemist Patrick Arnold, Conte and BALCO developed a then-undetectable steroid that provided training benefits for numerous athletes, including Olympic medalists and, allegedly and perhaps most famously, seven-time baseball MVP and all-time home run leader Barry Bonds.

    But Conte revealed his company's operations crossed paths with mixed martial arts very early in its run.

    "Here's what I was told – I don't want to create more multi-million dollar lawsuits against me, but here's the story that I was told – [Arnold] sold a whole bunch of [tetrahydrogestrinone, also known as 'The Clear'], like a gallon, to Bob Sapp, K-1 fighter," Conte said. "My understanding is this stuff was all over the NFL. I guess during this time he was out of the NFL, and there was a period of time when he played in the Canadian (Football) League before he went to Japan to do the K-1 fighting, but the point is this stuff was very widely distributed, was my understanding."

    But Conte didn't take a direct involvement in MMA until recent times, when he began to work with a few notable combat-sports athletes, including eight-time UFC veteran Kyle Kingsbury.

    With his history of prescribing and monitoring illegal doping, Conte understands some athletes are hesitant to receive his counsel. But Conte insists he's now doing everything by the book.

    "There are other top UFC fighters that do come to me and that I have tested and provided consultation for," Conte said. "And some of these choose to keep it on the down-low.

    "Some are very open and forgiving, and I greatly appreciate that opportunity. Others are just afraid of the downside, of the stigma that they're going to think they're on steroids. In reality, the guys that come to me and the guys that work with me are probably some of the cleanest guys out there."

    Conte said he bases his current programs on extensive testing and monitoring that he uses to "achieve an optimal balance" with his clients. Conte said he tests his athletes' blood and uses a high-tech "memory belt" to monitor things like caloric expenditure, VO2 max, ventilation and training load.

    From there, Conte said he develops a customized program for each of his clients.

    "It's not about mega-doses of anything," Conte said. "It's just about correcting weak links or depletions and deficiencies."

    So if the athletes he sees are clean, what makes Conte think as many as half of the sport's athletes aren't? Conte's June speech at the Association of Ringside Physicians' 2012 Annual Medical Seminar may provide an answer.

    "I talk to a lot of athletes out there about who's doing what," Conte said in June. "They're frank with me, partly because it's a two-way street. Give an example: One of the top MMA training centers in Northern California that has a number of UFC fighters, and I asked the owner of the facility and the head trainer what percentage of his athletes – the 16 UFC athletes that he had – were using drugs because he was asking me to help some of his athletes, and I said, 'Well, I can't help athletes that are using drugs.'

    "He wrote a list out. Long story short, eight out of the 16 were using performance-enhancing drugs. So, I think this is a small sample size, but I think these are all some of the top fighters in the UFC, so I think it is rampant."

    Conte did not specifically name the camp he was describing.

    Conte's speech, which was given in conjunction with Voluntary Anti-Doping Agency President Dr. Margaret Goodman, was issued as part of a series of educational seminars. While Conte is quick to point out he is not officially associated with the non-profit organization VADA, he does openly and frequently endorse the company's programs rather than suggesting combat sports such as MMA to rely solely on the overseeing athletic commissions.

    "You need a certain standardization," Conte said. "The level of testing [the commissions] provide is an absolute joke."

    Conte, who has in recent months taken to Twitter to encourage MMA fighters such as B.J. Penn, Rory MacDonald, Shane Carwin and Roy Nelson to work with VADA and enlist in additional, voluntary pre-fight drug testing, believes the solution to catching cheaters involves the testing of both blood and urine, as well as the hormone Erythropoietin (EPO).

    "State commissions don't test for [EPO]," Conte said. "That's my big argument about what these state commissions are doing is that they don't test for EPO. They don't test for growth hormone. They don't test for synthetic testosterone. When you say, 'Wow, these guys are getting busted all the time,' could you imagine if they had effective testing what would be going on?"

    Conte also believes carbon isotope ratio testing should be implemented, which allows a laboratory to determine whether testosterone in the body has been naturally produced or is synthetic. Of course, the cost for testing a single athlete with the full battery of Conte-recommended screens would hover around $1,000 – or nearly 10 times that of the panel currently utilized by most commissions.

    And unfortunately, that often means moral and ethical arguments are ultimately decided by available dollars and cents. Conte said that's not likely to change anytime soon.

    "The only way that's going to happen is if the people that make the majority of the money from sport – whether that be baseball, football, UFC, Olympics, whoever it is – when they develop a genuine interest, then they can implement a reasonably effective testing program," Conte said. "They're not doing that."


    MMA PED talk, TRT through the whole podcast but starts to get very mma specific around 1:20:00 ish
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