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Thread: The Hypoglycemic Diet

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  1. #1
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    Default The Hypoglycemic Diet

    Hypoglycemic Health Association of Australia - The Hypoglycemic Diet

    What is known as the hypoglycemic diet should really be called the “Natural Diet”. This is the diet that humans have consumed over the millions of years to which our digestive system has adapted. The “Natural Diet” is natural to the individual only and may be different from one person to another. Nordic European people who have consumed milk as part of their diet in their ancestry may have better tolerance to cow’s milk, than those people whose ancestry was not exposed to that kind of milk as in Asia or Africa. Southern European with a long history of alcohol consumption are more tolerant of alcohol than people for whom alcohol was never part in the hereditary diet, such as Australian aborigines.

    Furthermore, this natural diet has to take into account quirks of inborn genetic disorders such as gluten intolerance as in coeliac disease, Crohn’s Disease, or Ulcerative Colitis.. These may well be hidden behind the mask of hypoglycemic symptoms.

    The best plan is to ask yourself what diet your ancestors ate and you don’t even have to go back to very ancient times; think of your grand-parents. Think of what people ate in the 19th century without the sugar.

    Whatever diet you finish up with, you must choose a diet that you enjoy. By choosing a diet that you do not enjoy – called “force-feeding” - you may not produce the first necessary enzymes in the saliva as a first step in digestion.

    Probably the hypoglycemic diet differs from the natural diet in that the number of snack per day are increased.



    In brief the nutritional treatment of the hypoglycemic condition consists of:

    1) Avoidance of sugar, coffee, strong tea, nicotine if possible, refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, white rice, cakes and sugary drinks, candy bars, colas, cookies, ice cream sweetish fruits such as bananas, grapefruit, melons, honey and dates (these fruits may be reintroduced at a later stage in moderation) etc.



    2) High protein + complex carbohydrates snacks every three hours or sooner, to provide a slow release of glucose, and to prevent the hypoglycemic dip. A high protein breakfast must be considered the most important meal of the day. ”High-protein foods, such as fish, eggs, chicken, and beef, contain all twenty-two, including the nine amino acids that are considered essential for humans.” Source Plus animal fats that are also essential for good health. Eat plenty of green vegetables and fruits and the more varied the diet the better it is.



    3) Supplementation of diet with Anti-stress vitamin B-Complex tablets, including vitamin B6, B3, B12, chromium picolinate, magnesium, zinc + Vitamin C, and fishoil (omega-3 fatty acids), vitamin D. For a fuller list of nutrients, deficiency of which can be responsible for mood disorders see: R Hemat, 165 See 6 studies in support of omega-3 fatty acids for Depression and Bipolar Disorder. See also Rich Rich Sources of Nutrients. Also make sure that the mineral sulphur MSM is included in your diet See: Dr Jospeh Mercola on Sulphur.



    4) Other supplements that could slow down the absorption of glucose (thereby avoiding blood sugar peaks and the release of stress hormones) are: Psyllium Seeds Husks (1 tbsp per day), Glucomannan including pectin (follow instructions on bottle), Grapefruit and Cinnamon. Also see “Herbs with Hypoglycemic Effects “ at: Research Evidence for Hypoglycemia



    5) Avoidance of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s) GMO’s is having a dramatic influence on our health especially on our digestive system responsible for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s Disease, Autism, Allergies etc etc. See 59 min video.



    The Hypoglycemic diet aims at normalizing blood sugar levels, thereby normalizing stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol, that are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of mood-swings, depression, anxiety, phobias, alcoholism and drug-addiction.
    Such a diet needs to be adjusted to the individual needs and nutritional biochemistry. It needs to take into account the influence of allergies.

    Furthermore, it should be realized that the beneficial effects of the hypoglycemic diet may take considerable time. If drugs or medications has been used it may take a year for damaged neuro-receptors to be repaired by a high protein diet. (Volkow ND et als. 2001). Normally, the effects of this diet is noticeable within three months. If after this time symptoms still persist, it is time to seek the help of a clinical nutritionist or nutritional doctor for further testing, diagnosis and treatment.

    As a rule of thumb ask yourself: “Is what I am eating nature-made of man-made?” Nature-made food consists of complex carbohydrates and proteins, the kind of food we were meant to eat.
    Try to introduce the diet slowly and gradually. A strict hypoglycemic diet may cause you to feel worst at first, because your are left with low blood sugar levels. This would last a week or so.

    These symptoms can be alleviated by taking a tablespoon of GLYCERINE mixed in milk or in a diluted natural fruit juice three times day (ratio of 20 mls of glycerine to 285 mls of water) ). GLYCERINE, which can be considered a general anti-stress remedy, is metabolized in the liver before it is converted to “energy”, so it does not stimulate excess insulin secretion from the pancreas. An other alternative sweetener is FRUCTOSE, which is also metabolized in the liver into glucose. But excess fructose will be converted to triglycerides. But generally fructose should also be avoided.
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  2. #2
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    I advocate for the 'Put down the fork' diet, coupled with the 'Step away from the computer and take a walk' exercise plan.

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    2 and 3 are myths and have been consistently proven as not true....especially number 3...so I eat a natural diet yet I need to go out and buy "supplements"? I bet you anything that the source is in someway financed by a supplement company.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheKidInside View Post
    2 and 3 are myths and have been consistently proven as not true....especially number 3...so I eat a natural diet yet I need to go out and buy "supplements"? I bet you anything that the source is in someway financed by a supplement company.
    this is a topic of controversy for every diet, the paleo diet in particular. another thing to consider is that toxic environment modern humans live in, (looking past the shitty diets most people have, you have to consider the abnormal sleep patterns, air pollution, household toxins like glues and resins in building supplies/carpets, and the offset vitamin d production from so much artificial light and staying up all night). all that considered, certain strong arguments can be made for supplementation. personally, i stay more or less on the paleo diet, avoiding as much sugar and enriched carbs as i can, (though since i'm very active between bjj, weight training and biking everywhere, i'll consume rice and sweet potatoes a good deal). completely ignoring the glycemic index, the toxin and allergen levels of food greatly affect the eater.... so i give those just as much consideration as the macronutrients.

    anyway, long story short, the basic pillars of nutrition for me:

    about 70% of my diet is veg. i focus on green leafies, with different carbs sources like carrots and winter squashes, and avocado and coconut for fat. for fruit, i consume a lot of grapefruit, but avoid the higher sugar fruits. i also make batches of my own kimchee once a month or so, which act as an inexpensive veg staple for me.

    with the exception of rice, i don't consume much if any grain. it sucks that i love beer so much... i miss it, and if i give in at any time, it's usually for a beer.

    my biggest protein source is probably free-range eggs, or fish. i eat a lot of tilapia just because i'm pretty poor at the moment... though once i'm better off financially i'll source something better. i'll eat meat often enough, (not quite every day), but can't afford to have a whole buffalo on hand at all times like the paleo guys would suggest.

    i avoid sugar, but godammit i need my maple syrup. i use stevia to sweeten things like shakes or hot chocolate.

    dairy is something i'm experimenting with. i pretty much stopped drinking milk and consuming cheese, or most any dairy beside grass-fed butter. i'm adding it back into my diet to see how if affects my digestive tract, and perhaps more importantly, cognitive function. if anything can improve my mental performance, that's arguably a better reason to pursue it than stomach health.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repenter View Post
    this is a topic of controversy for every diet, the paleo diet in particular. another thing to consider is that toxic environment modern humans live in, (looking past the shitty diets most people have, you have to consider the abnormal sleep patterns, air pollution, household toxins like glues and resins in building supplies/carpets, and the offset vitamin d production from so much artificial light and staying up all night). all that considered, certain strong arguments can be made for supplementation. personally, i stay more or less on the paleo diet, avoiding as much sugar and enriched carbs as i can, (though since i'm very active between bjj, weight training and biking everywhere, i'll consume rice and sweet potatoes a good deal). completely ignoring the glycemic index, the toxin and allergen levels of food greatly affect the eater.... so i give those just as much consideration as the macronutrients.

    anyway, long story short, the basic pillars of nutrition for me:

    about 70% of my diet is veg. i focus on green leafies, with different carbs sources like carrots and winter squashes, and avocado and coconut for fat. for fruit, i consume a lot of grapefruit, but avoid the higher sugar fruits. i also make batches of my own kimchee once a month or so, which act as an inexpensive veg staple for me.

    with the exception of rice, i don't consume much if any grain. it sucks that i love beer so much... i miss it, and if i give in at any time, it's usually for a beer.

    my biggest protein source is probably free-range eggs, or fish. i eat a lot of tilapia just because i'm pretty poor at the moment... though once i'm better off financially i'll source something better. i'll eat meat often enough, (not quite every day), but can't afford to have a whole buffalo on hand at all times like the paleo guys would suggest.

    i avoid sugar, but godammit i need my maple syrup. i use stevia to sweeten things like shakes or hot chocolate.

    dairy is something i'm experimenting with. i pretty much stopped drinking milk and consuming cheese, or most any dairy beside grass-fed butter. i'm adding it back into my diet to see how if affects my digestive tract, and perhaps more importantly, cognitive function. if anything can improve my mental performance, that's arguably a better reason to pursue it than stomach health.
    great second part with which I won't argue. Except if you're including dairy try to obtain some raw dairy. there's a PA farm that now "illegally" sells/delivers to NYC raw goat and cow dairy so I am excited to try some kefir from them even though I eat mostly plant-based.

    As far as the first; instead of supplementing a lot of that stuff I urge my clients to slowly shift away from that stuff. So, if a client I've been working on with for, say, a year then I could mention that hey instead if windex why don't you take some orange/mandarine/tangerine/clementine skins and soak them in lemon/vinegar water for a day and viola, organic/all natural all purpose cleaner....You're right about the environmental toxins for sure.

  6. #6
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    Dieting is hard not complicated.

    Eat good foods in sensible amounts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CRisCO View Post
    Dieting is hard not complicated.

    Eat good foods in sensible amounts.
    Fuuuuuuuck that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CRisCO View Post
    Dieting is hard not complicated.

    Eat good foods in sensible amounts.
    Umm, you say that to a Southerner and that means fried chicken and grits...You say that to someone on the Mediterranean shore and that means cheese and hummus, you say that to ...you get the point.

    It is extremely complicated because you must discover what works for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheKidInside View Post
    Umm, you say that to a Southerner and that means fried chicken and grits...You say that to someone on the Mediterranean shore and that means cheese and hummus, you say that to ...you get the point.

    It is extremely complicated because you must discover what works for you.
    Good food translates to fried chicken and grits? If someone is that fucking stupid they should have died long ago if not for societal constructs.

    Meat/Veggies all day nothing else. Common sense brah

  10. #10
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    I need mah coffeeeeee!

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