Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33

Thread: Coming to terms with the oddness of Silva vs. Weidman

Hybrid View

  1. Default Coming to terms with the oddness of Silva vs. Weidman

    http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2013/7/7/...-ending-finish

    After the initial shock of Anderson Silva being knocked down and finished by challenger Chris Weidman at UFC 162's main event last night -- a moment that delighted some fans and devastated others -- some observers of what transpired may have been left with a feeling of uneasiness in the immediate aftermath. I myself am still trying to get a grip on the sequence that ended Silva's night, without even thinking about it being the abrupt halt to the best UFC win and title defence streak in the promotion's not-quite 20 year history.

    Chris Weidman had the backing of many fans, pundits and peers who believed that he had a very real chance of winning. In Weidman's own mind, he believed he would win with internal doubts being minimal-to-none. It's hard to believe though that anyone in their right mind would have picked Weidman to knock down Silva and finish him with strikes in the second round.

    Silva was the favourite in the stand up by a mile, and after the initial success of Weidman using his takedown and ground fighting skills in the first, blending his experience as a Division I collegiate wrestler with his prodigal absorption of the jiu jitsu game, it appeared Silva had figured Weidman out by the half way point in the opening stanza. Silva's timing, speed and footwork were all on point and for many it just felt like it was a matter of time before Silva set Weidman up for the kill.

    Instead we witnessed what appeared to be a case of Silva breaking the cardinal rule of many striking disciplines when he failed to keep his hands up and got clipped by a Weidman left hook. For any other fighter, I could readily accept this as reason enough for the end of their night. We see it often at the lower level where either fatigue or inexperience perhaps combined with cockiness causes the dropping of their guard leaving them open to attack.

    Anderson Silva though, is better than that. The aforementioned timing, speed and footwork of Anderson Silva is still several levels above his contemporaries, his technique and skill so solid that he can use feints and fakes to snake charm opponents before landing pin precision strikes. Anderson Silva is not someone who typically has a low fight IQ, and yet his in-ring theatrics that are meant to frustrate and deceive the men standing across the cage from him last night reached a new height of absurdness.

    Not since Silva's Charlie Chaplin routine of hiding behind the referee in his fight with Demian Maia have we seen him act such the fool inside the Octagon, but last night his wobbly-kneed antics trumped his Abu Dhabi shenanigans. When Weidman initially tagged him, Silva appeared caught on the back foot as he tried to gesticulate the feigned trouble he was in; two punches later he was down on his back getting hit further until Herb Dean waved off the bout.

    It's hard to recall though the last time Silva's weight was shifted to the back and he was that prone to gravity outside perhaps a couple of the exchanges he had with Chael Sonnen in their first fight, where Sonnen parleyed his move-forward punching into takedown opportunities. Usually when Siva is on the back foot, he's stable enough to land counter punches, and it's brief enough for him to circle out of the path he's being forced down.

    Some unreasonable fans have called the fight a fix, even some believing Silva bet on Weidman to win to make a ton of money at the bookmakers and that he was looking to get knocked down. Such claims are largely unwarranted as it's too difficult to fix fights of this magnitude without an investigation uncovering such blatant corruption, and it doesn't consider the money Silva would be giving up now the prospect of super-fights featuring him and Georges St. Pierre or Jon Jones are dead and buried.

    The unfortunate reality is likely this: the best fighter we've ever seen in Mixed Martial Arts acted like an amateur and paid the consequences. We just have to accept the oddness of it.
    When you're down.... you're down 4-Life


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    154

    Default

    How the hell does anyone think what Anderson did was odd? That's his game. Why is it so hard to believe that his game just didn't work this time? Nothing he did was out of the ordinary. The only thing different was he fought a guy who was able to beat him at his game.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    'Merica
    Posts
    5,770

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashy Larry View Post
    How the hell does anyone think what Anderson did was odd? That's his game. Why is it so hard to believe that his game just didn't work this time? Nothing he did was out of the ordinary. The only thing different was he fought a guy who was able to beat him at his game.
    He didn't do any of that stuff when he fought Hendo or Franklin (except for a tiny bit the 2nd fight). So if it is "a part of his game", it doesn't need to be. Most of the opponents he did that stuff extensively with weren't as dangerous as Weidman. It doesn't mean Weidman didn't do a great job himself, but by no means did Anderson fight the best that he could...which was totally on him.

    I hope this isn't too big, because it's awesome.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Vegas
    Posts
    810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashy Larry View Post
    How the hell does anyone think what Anderson did was odd? That's his game. Why is it so hard to believe that his game just didn't work this time? Nothing he did was out of the ordinary. The only thing different was he fought a guy who was able to beat him at his game.
    Yes, and that guy was able to beat him at his own game in part due to having the reach advantage. Whereas Silva enjoyed that advantage for his entire UFC career till the Weidman fight.
    "I don't want them to like me, because when I'm in the ring, punches fly to the face. It is not a tenderness time. I am not falling in love. And he knows that when the fight starts I kick faces."
    "I think you should be able to kick in the head, it’s a fun thing to do."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sniggles View Post
    I want those 7 years back.
    Yeah me to...

    Quote Originally Posted by cpac77 View Post
    Yes, and that guy was able to beat him at his own game in part due to having the reach advantage. Whereas Silva enjoyed that advantage for his entire UFC career till the Weidman fight.
    Well he hasn't always had a reach advantage at least when he moved up to LHW, but that aside he clearly misjudged Weidmans reach. I also think that Weidman deserves a little more credit as well he set up the left with a very unorthodox right just before that put Silva's chin right where it needed to be. Silva dropping his hands certainly helped but Weidman's ability to deal with it mentally and training for it is really what lead to the win.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,174

    Default

    As great a fighter as Silva is, I cannot stand a fighter who shows disrespect to his opponents, especially in the Octagon. When is the 1st time we saw showboating from Anderson........was it maybe against Leites? It annoyed me back then, and continued to become more annoying as he adopted that from then on. I couldn't wait for a guy like Weidman to come along and put Silva in his place. He needed that immensely.

    What Silva does from here on out is up to him. He can take this as a learning experience, and get back to fighting seriously. If this is the case, Silva should win the rematch. He's been talking a lot about fighting Jones Jr, and may just really focus on going in that direction, leaving MMA behind him. I sure hope it's the former, because if he decides to get serious again, I think he can be right back in that position of dominance he has held for so long now, and hold it until he decides to retire.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sackville N.B
    Posts
    3,096

    Default

    The only thing that was remotely weird about the fight is that Anderson fought someone that wasn't intimidated of him. Anderson did the same arrogant showboating that he always does and this time he paid for it. Plain and simple.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnchorPunch View Post
    So if I don't sin, when I die, I go to Canada? Right?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fe1 View Post
    The only thing that was remotely weird about the fight is that Anderson fought someone that wasn't intimidated of him. Anderson did the same arrogant showboating that he always does and this time he paid for it. Plain and simple.
    Right on - It was the same thing with when Liddell began to get beat. The guys that were intimidated or gave him to much repsect while striking in the ring with him had the most trouble. I guess it was Rampage that led the way showing no fear while fighting Liddell.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,152

    Default

    Honestly, I think the only thing he did out of the ordinary was the whole faking being hurt thing. I've never see him shrink down and wobble his legs, pretending to be hurt.

    I don't want to take anything away from Weidman, but I honestly thing anyone with some decent punching power, that simply didn't fall into his "plan" would have knocked his ass out far more devastatingly. I mean Hendo ko'ing Bisping type of KO, where he would have been out, and still got sledgehammerered in the face while he was out cold. The reason I say this is Weidman's follow-up punches. They weren't exactly pin-point accurate, in fact most of them missed the mark. From the replays, there were only 2-3 punches that even landed...not that it made a difference.

    Two things here. First and foremost, I hope Anderson learns a huge lesson here, and gets rid of his ego, and stops clowning around altogether. I also hope that Weidman watches the tape and works with a legit boxing trainer and improves his striking accuracy. As a new champion, who just KO'd Anderson Silva, I hope he learns from this fight & potential weaknesses.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spoon View Post
    I don't want to take anything away from Weidman
    But you're about to...

    but I honestly thing anyone with some decent punching power, that simply didn't fall into his "plan" would have knocked his ass out far more devastatingly.
    So Weidman knocked out the best MMA striker of all time and it wasn't good enough for you...

    The reason I say this is Weidman's follow-up punches. They weren't exactly pin-point accurate, in fact most of them missed the mark. From the replays, there were only 2-3 punches that even landed...not that it made a difference.
    Because its really easy to hit Anderson Silva with punches...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •