Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Weidman: I want to solidify my belt

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    19,386

    Default Weidman: I want to solidify my belt

    Weidman: I want to solidify my belt

    Although Chris Weidman is the undisputed UFC middleweight champion, he knows that to be a real champion, you must defend the title:

    "I feel the same as a lot of other champions. I feel like to solidify my championship, I need to defend my belt and especially going against the same guy, with everybody saying it was a fluke. It's not really extra pressure, just more motivation to prove them wrong. I'm just excited to go out there and prove them wrong."

    Weidman shockingly knocked out Silva in the second round of their championship duel at UFC 162 in "Sin City." And the pride of New York does not feel like he has to own up to another knockout or win the fight differently a second time around.

    "I'm going to go out there and try to finish him whether it's on the feet or the ground. I'll take either one. Whatever I feel like I could get at the time, I'll take it," he said.

    Sonnen: Takedowns key to Weidman winning
    UFC Tonight Host Chael Sonnen on Silva vs. Weidman: “Anderson Silva is the favorite in this fight. You could say in the last one he got caught. What people miss, he was getting dominated before the knockout in the last one. Anderson has a big gap to close.”

    UFC TONIGHT Host Kenny Florian on Anderson Silva’s keys to victory at UFC 168: “Anderson needs to go back to what he knows. He’s got to be on his wrestling game and to keep the range. Leg kicks from the outside will help him keep the range. If he does get taken down, he’s got to work from the bottom, or get back to his feet. And he can’t be cocky.”

    Sonnen on Weidman’s keys to victories: “It’s the takedowns. He was a college all-American in wrestling. He’s got to move forward, he can’t back up. He’s got to land the takedown, and have ground control. He’s got to look for a submission, but watch out for Silva’s submission attempts.”

    Sonnen on Silva’s clowning: “That’s how he sets you up. He’s like the Medusa; he freezes you and gets you to turn to stone, then knocks you out. He did that to stop the take downs in the first fight.”

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NY--->MIA
    Posts
    8,281

    Default

    I'm not sure what fight Chael watched because Silva was not getting dominated by any means against Weidman it was very close .
    "DO YOU THINK I'M JUST GOING TO SIT THERE AND LET YOU KILL ME JON???"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Deep down the rabbit hole.
    Posts
    7,304

    Default

    I watched the fight recently and it wasn't close at all like it was said after the fight. Anderson practically did nothing the entire time.

    Chris pressured Anderson in the first round and kept octagon control. Once he landed the takedown, it showed who the dominant man on the ground was. Chris bounced Andersons head off the mat with some hard GNP and even went for submissions. Anderson will not win the ground battle.

    Once Silva knew what he was in for, he started desperately taunting Chris, trying to make it seem as if he was not phased or Chris couldn't hurt him. It may have seemed like the second round was close to some before the KO, but if you take out all of the taunting, Anderson threw a few kicks and that's it.

    In ways, Chris did dominate Anderson in the first fight. This is one of the most important rematches ever. Cannot wait for next Saturday.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    I feel that a champion who defends his belt should be held in higher esteem than one who does not defend it.
    You have to know what you don't know.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    11,936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IceCold48 View Post
    I'm not sure what fight Chael watched because Silva was not getting dominated by any means against Weidman it was very close .
    I'll go with M1ckey in that I didn't think it was close. Sonnen is full of hyperbole, I wouldn't say it was a "dominant" performance, bu any means, but that's probably the most overused word in sports journalism. For instance, I cringed at how revisionist history has Edgar "dominating" Penn in their fights, it's just a word that is thrown around too often.

    But I had Weidman winning the first round very clearly, and he finished Anderson in the second.

    The first fight may or may not have any bearing on the rematch, but it wasn't close. It's interesting how there was such an outcry for an immediate rematch, regardless...while I still wouldn't call it "dominant," Weidman finishing Silva was at least closer to being a "dominant" win--the worst you could say is that it was a far more definitive win--than Anderson's wins over Henderson or Marquardt, and neither of them got rematches even after they'd earned one.

    rh
    All manner of men came to work for the News: everything from wild young Turks who wanted to rip the world in half and start all over again -- to tired, beer-bellied old hacks who wanted nothing more than to live out their days in peace before a bunch of lunatics ripped the world in half.

    Dr. Hunter S. Thompson
    The Rum Diary

    Yeah, Bye.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    19,386

    Default

    Relaxed in his gym, Anderson Silva says Chris Weidman rematch is for his legacy

    So he was playful with many of his answers as reporters gathered around.

    What of the fact that Chris Weidman, the man who knocked him out at UFC 162, said Tuesday that he planned on finishing Silva again in Las Vegas? Silva laughed, mimicked a panic, and said "I'm scared."

    What of those who have compared some of his feats in the Octagon to his martial arts hero, Bruce Lee? "I'm down here," said Silva while pointing to the floor, "and Bruce Lee is up here."

    When it comes to the heart of the matter, though, Silva remained as elusive as he was dodging Forrest Griffin's punches at UFC 101. The reason the rematch between Silva and Weidman on Dec. 28 is going to be one of the most-viewed fights in UFC history, of course, is because of what happened the first time out.

    Some viewed what happened that night as Silva clowning and Weidman making him pay. Others saw it as Silva playing his usual game but getting caught. Either way, the end result was one of the most shocking moments in the history of combat sports, as Weidman knocked Silva cold.

    So what happened? "Sometimes you have good days for working, sometimes you have bad days for working. My last fight was a bad day."

    Are we going to see what we saw last time? "I watch the last fight," Silva said. "And I see my technique and I talk to my friends and my coach and I don't change too much. I train hard (on) my mental (game) because my mental was bad."

    So maybe, come Dec. 28, we'll see the Anderson Silva who came out with fire in his eyes against Rich Franklin and knocked him halfway back to Cincinnati. Maybe we'll see the Silva who toyed with his foes before finishing them. Maybe we'll see the fighter who got off to slow starts with wrestlers like Chael Sonnen and Dan Henderson and somehow willed his way to victory.

    No matter how hard we pry between now and the end of next week, Silva isn't going to tell us his plans. And according to his manager, Ed Soares, that's exactly why UFC 168 is going to be so big.

    "We don't know which Anderson we're going to see," Soares said. "I don't even know. Look, what happened in Anderson's last fight is, in every Anderson Silva fight, you're going to see a magic moment happen. For 16 fights, Anderson was on the right end of the magic moment. In the last fight, Anderson was on the wrong end. Hat's off to Chris for pulling it off. But I don't know what we'll see and the fans don't and that's why so many people are going to tune in."

    Interest in the fight is such that even Silva's fellow UFC 168 card-mates have thoughts to share. Josh Barnett has been around MMA as long as Silva. The former UFC heavyweight champion, who fights Travis Browne on the main card in Las Vegas, isn't an easy man to impress, but even he's blown away by what the champ's been able to accomplish.

    "Silva's awesome," Barnett said in a recent chat with MMAFighting. "To be as good as he's been in this business as long as he has, that's something else. This isn't an easy game to get to the top and it's more difficult to stay there. Honestly, I think Silva wins this one handily. No disrespect to Chris, he has a humble attitude and he's putting in his work, but I saw things in that first fight that I think Silva's going to exploit."

    Silva's not going to discuss those "things" Barnett referenced. He did open up, though, when asked questions about matters other than Weidman. Silva was asked how he managed to get things together at his career's midpoint, when he suffered three losses in eight fights and appeared to have stalled out. Silva credited the Nogueira brothers for getting the most out of his talents.

    "Rogerio and Minotauro helped me straighten my faults for training and my dream to fight," said Silva, who memorably submitted Sonnen in the fifth round of their UFC 117 fight after Sonnen had mocked Silva's black belt. "I need to say thank you so much for Rodrigo and Rogerio because the guys gave me the chance to follow my dream."

    That dream turned into his unprecedented run at the top, holding the UFC middleweight title just shy of six years and nine months and winning 17 fights in a row.

    Which brings us back to Weidman. Finally, after shrugging it off, Silva admits that the Weidman fight means something more to him than just any old fight.

    "This is very important for me," Silva said. "For my family, my coach, for my legacy, this is very important."

    And what does Silva view as his legacy?

    "So the people, maybe in five or 10 years, the people say ‘my gosh, this guy changed the sport. For five years this guy fight for the best fight for the people.' In Brazil, I have a program for kids and I see the kids, ‘oh my gosh, one day I go to fight because you changed my life.' This is more important to me, to change kids' lives, than to beat Chris Weidman."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m1ckeykn0x View Post
    I watched the fight recently and it wasn't close at all like it was said after the fight. Anderson practically did nothing the entire time.

    Chris pressured Anderson in the first round and kept octagon control. Once he landed the takedown, it showed who the dominant man on the ground was. Chris bounced Andersons head off the mat with some hard GNP and even went for submissions. Anderson will not win the ground battle.

    Once Silva knew what he was in for, he started desperately taunting Chris, trying to make it seem as if he was not phased or Chris couldn't hurt him. It may have seemed like the second round was close to some before the KO, but if you take out all of the taunting, Anderson threw a few kicks and that's it.

    In ways, Chris did dominate Anderson in the first fight. This is one of the most important rematches ever. Cannot wait for next Saturday.
    Whether or not it was 'close' is pretty subjective and depends on what your definition of close is. I mostly agree with your analysis (especially regarding the first round) but I'll add a bit of my perspective to it.

    In the second round Anderson stuffed Weidman's takedown (I think there was just one) pretty effectively, and at least for me it felt like there was a little shift in momentum after this. Anderson started to get loose (in retrospect, obviously TOO loose) and open up with his standup and for me it felt like it was just a matter of time for Chris at that point. Anderson also just missed on some possible fight ending kicks.

    Now, you could argue Chris is that good and meant for him to just miss, and you could argue that the shift in momentum was just my own perception, and I wouldn't be able to say you are wrong. Objectively it was not close because Chris did everything that mattered, but subjectively it felt close to me.

    My point is that I felt that fight showed that either man could have won that night, and that either man could win in the rematch, without anything (health, gameplan, experience) changing.
    ...which in of itself is a testament to Weidman's performance seeing as he was a major underdog in popular opinion, and is now probably close to even.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,685

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m1ckeykn0x View Post
    I watched the fight recently and it wasn't close at all like it was said after the fight. Anderson practically did nothing the entire time.

    Chris pressured Anderson in the first round and kept octagon control. Once he landed the takedown, it showed who the dominant man on the ground was. Chris bounced Andersons head off the mat with some hard GNP and even went for submissions. Anderson will not win the ground battle.
    Anderson did get back to his feet if I remember correctly and after the Sonnen fight I think it's safe to say he's very dangerous off of his back so I wouldn't say that Anderson will not win the ground battle but yes Weidman did win that round basically because of the GnP.


    Quote Originally Posted by SWIFTboy View Post

    In the second round Anderson stuffed Weidman's takedown (I think there was just one) pretty effectively, and at least for me it felt like there was a little shift in momentum after this. Anderson started to get loose (in retrospect, obviously TOO loose) and open up with his standup and for me it felt like it was just a matter of time for Chris at that point. Anderson also just missed on some possible fight ending kicks.
    I agree, Anderson seemed more interested on putting on a show than actually fighting. There were a lot opportunities for him to attack Weidman but he didn't do it. He's the more skilled striker and definitely had the speed advantage but seemed to me like he wasn't concerned about winning the fight.

    Quote Originally Posted by SWIFTboy View Post
    Now, you could argue Chris is that good and meant for him to just miss, and you could argue that the shift in momentum was just my own perception, and I wouldn't be able to say you are wrong. Objectively it was not close because Chris did everything that mattered, but subjectively it felt close to me.

    My point is that I felt that fight showed that either man could have won that night, and that either man could win in the rematch, without anything (health, gameplan, experience) changing.
    ...which in of itself is a testament to Weidman's performance seeing as he was a major underdog in popular opinion, and is now probably close to even.
    All the credit goes to Weidman for not putting up with the BS and knocking Anderson out cold. I think Weidman took away that invincibility Anderson had with the KO which is going to make for an interesting rematch but if Anderson actually comes out to fight I think he takes it pretty convincingly

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,807

    Default

    Its pretty hard for me to label the fight either close or dominant for either guy besides when Weidman got Silva down. I honestly don't think Silva would have got to his feet if Chris didn't go for that ankle lock.

    As far as the stand up Chris didn't do much imo besides coming forward. Silva also didn't throw many fight ending shots besides maybe two head kicks. He mostly taunted and threw leg kicks. He had a lot of chances to punish Chris for his mistakes and didn't. To Silva's credit tho and Chris's credit tho, Silva did stuff some takedowns and Chris was pretty crafty with the ankle pick from the sprawl position.

    I think the second fight Chris will try to gnp or sub silva. I don't think he will want to give Silva any chance at winning by standing with him. On another note Silva's over the top taunting imo was just to keep Chris more interested in trying to take his head off rather than take him down.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Rockford, IL
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Yeah, I dont think Weidman "dominated" the fight either. But from what I remember I did think that Weidman won the 1st round pretty clearly, and was winning the 2nd round (2nd round was a lot closer though) before he knocked Anderson out.

    I don't want to argue with anyone about it lol, just my two cents.
    "Gentlemen, we will chase perfection, and we will chase it relentlessly, knowing all the while we can never attain it. But along the way, we shall catch excellence."
    — Vince Lombardi

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •