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Thread: Will Athletic Commissions ever address Extreme Weight Cuts?

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    Like I've said in the past, I consider weight-cutting (along with proper re-hydrating) a skill. Because it has great bearing on strength, speed, endurance, etc., I love the extra question marks it adds to the build up to fights.

    Is it safe? No.
    But in a sport where people spend years punching, kicking, and choking other human beings for mass entertainment... I really don't care.
    ------------------

  2. #22
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    Actually some states require same day ways ins. NC being one of them.
    Ok maybe I'm wrong about that, but apparently they have a rule that you can not be over 13 lbs heavier then your target weight the night before.
    Last edited by optimusjoel; 03-11-2014 at 06:45 PM.

  3. #23
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    There is athletic commission that do same day weigh ins. I believe Alabama is one of them. So there has been the application of it to draw conclusions from. I personally do not know how it is has gone but my instinct is it less safe. If a fighter goes into weigh in heavy he is going to have a rough cut but he will still be able to rehydrate. If he has to be less than ten pounds going into the fight he will not be properly hydrated come fight time and have to take blows to the head in that state. That is worse for you than a big weight cut.

    A big reason why fans don't like weight cutting is seeing large weight advantages come fight time. Banning weight cutting and having fighters fight at their natural weight helps reduce that, but it will still be rampant in this sport given the few weight classes. As long as you have twenty pounds difference between MW and LHW you are going to have fights where the fighters have close to that in weight discrepancy. A fighter that is just big enough to fight at LHW is going to have a huge weight advantage over a fighter that is a little bit too big to cut down the MW. The entire division system needs to be restructured and have more division infused into it. 155, 165, 175, 190, 205, 220, 265 is perfect IMO.
    "If a man with no arms and a man with no legs started learning karate, the same light bulb would appear over every head in Japan. That’s right: Glue them together and see if it can kill a panda."

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by kalebarker View Post

    A big reason why fans don't like weight cutting is seeing large weight advantages come fight time. Banning weight cutting and having fighters fight at their natural weight helps reduce that, but it will still be rampant in this sport given the few weight classes. As long as you have twenty pounds difference between MW and LHW you are going to have fights where the fighters have close to that in weight discrepancy. A fighter that is just big enough to fight at LHW is going to have a huge weight advantage over a fighter that is a little bit too big to cut down the MW. The entire division system needs to be restructured and have more division infused into it. 155, 165, 175, 190, 205, 220, 265 is perfect IMO.
    I have to disagree with this. the last thing we really need is more weight classes. It will just muddy the field and actually promote more weight class jumping.

    It is my understanding that weight classes are not defined as that weight but as a max. Like HW is 265. Once you hit 205 you are a LHW till you drop below 186. Now if you weight 190 or even 193 then cutting to 185 is no problem. But when you have guys walking around at over 200 trying to cut down to 185 and even 170 that is where the issue comes in.

    If you had same day weigh ins and you walk around in the 190s you could get to 185 and hold it for a couple of days with problems and not damage and no hydration issues going into the fight. If you cant (i would be shocked) then tough you fight at a higher weight class

  5. #25
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    And if you weighed 197 as a fighting weight you would have to compete against guys that weigh 215 at the end of their camp. More weight classes means more fighters competing at an optimal weight. It may muddy the divisions and create more division jumping but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Fighters being able to jump up or down a division easier creates more potential matchups and makes the sport more interesting. Think about how many great matches could happen at 195 if the UFC had it as an official division.
    "If a man with no arms and a man with no legs started learning karate, the same light bulb would appear over every head in Japan. That’s right: Glue them together and see if it can kill a panda."

  6. #26
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    If I were the Supreme Overlord of MMA, same-day weigh ins would be one of the sweeping reforms I'd make [after the executions].

    Again, I'd give fighters and trainers a six month grace period to get used to the idea, but I'd tie not only purse percentages to weighing in correctly, but the licensing of cornermen and trainers--ideally, they want their fighter coming in at the ideal natural weight, and allowing them to cut dangerously would be addressed. I'd have a team to measure not only weight, but hydration, electrolyte levels and body fat content. Penalties would be levied for fighters coming in up to 5% overweight, but the fighter could still compete with the approval of the opponents camp. Anyone coming in over 5% would be unable to compete, regardless of what the opponent wanted, and a sub would be brought in. With fighters staying close to natural weight, you'd have a LOT more viable substitutes available when a fighter missed weight so badly that they couldn't compete. I'd earmark potential substitutes when the bout agreement was initially signed.

    I'd add one weight class, but I'd change many of weight limits a bit:
    ....< 126.....................Flyweight
    127 - 135.....................Bantamweight
    136 - 145.....................Featherweight
    146 - 156.....................Lightweight
    157 - 168.....................Welterweight
    169 - 183.....................Middleweight
    184 - 201.....................Light Heavyweight
    202 - 226.....................Cruiserweight
    227 - 265.....................Heavyweight

    The fluctuations in classes are less random and have an incrementally larger range as the fighters increase in mass.

    I'd also make sweeping reform to PED testing, including tying that to the licensing of trainers and cornermen as well. But that's all stuff I've said before, in other threads.

    rh
    Last edited by rivethead; 03-12-2014 at 03:48 PM.
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  7. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by H0SS View Post
    That was good enough to get you off the list.



    rh
    All manner of men came to work for the News: everything from wild young Turks who wanted to rip the world in half and start all over again -- to tired, beer-bellied old hacks who wanted nothing more than to live out their days in peace before a bunch of lunatics ripped the world in half.

    Dr. Hunter S. Thompson
    The Rum Diary

    Yeah, Bye.

  8. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by kalebarker View Post
    And if you weighed 197 as a fighting weight you would have to compete against guys that weigh 215 at the end of their camp. More weight classes means more fighters competing at an optimal weight. It may muddy the divisions and create more division jumping but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Fighters being able to jump up or down a division easier creates more potential matchups and makes the sport more interesting. Think about how many great matches could happen at 195 if the UFC had it as an official division.
    1. Doesn't that happen at HW now?
    2. If its same day weigh in do you think you can really lose / gain 10 pounds in that day?

  9. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalebarker View Post
    And if you weighed 197 as a fighting weight you would have to compete against guys that weigh 215 at the end of their camp. More weight classes means more fighters competing at an optimal weight. It may muddy the divisions and create more division jumping but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Fighters being able to jump up or down a division easier creates more potential matchups and makes the sport more interesting. Think about how many great matches could happen at 195 if the UFC had it as an official division.
    It also opens the door for titles being held up by champs that want to fight in multiple divisions to win championships in both... which is a bad thing in my opinion. Several divisions are already weak on top 10 talent as is and splitting the division in half makes them worse. Sure some guys may be able to bounce between the two but they may only do it just to get a fight... other guys will stick to the shallower talent pool of one division because they can be a top 5 guy there.

    In the scenario mentioned if you were a 197lbs you'd alter your diet and training overall and drop that 7lbs and fight in the lower division

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