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Thread: Machida Calls out Luke Rockhold For October Bout

  1. #21
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    It surprises me that Machida has not tried to be much more agressive. When he fights in an agressive way, he is usually very successful.

    Years ago he was just avoiding attacks and he would land some solid combination of his own, and that was enough to win the round.
    Now he fights passive but he gets hit many times and he loses the first rounds, then when in the final round he finally decides to fight agressively and wins the round, it is too late because he has lost the previous rounds so at the end he loses the fight.
    Not only brazilians can do this stuff


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rise View Post
    The one guy who gets a lot of flak on here for not adjusting and rightfully so is BJ Penn. He did it once in the Fitch fight where he added in some wrestling by training with Hughes but his cardio hurt him again.
    True, but now that we've seen what BJ's idea of evolving is, he probably did himself a favor by remaining stagnant - at least it was a high quality stagnation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rise View Post
    As for Machida definitely not lazy but it will always come down to his defensive mindset and and wanting to counter. It just seems like he doesn't realize that he is capable of being better then the other guy even as the aggressor or fighting in the pocket.
    He may not be capable. Some people are just far more comfortable being defensive than offensive. Different sport, but same principle: Dikembe Mutombo was super quick and smooth when an opponent was driving into his paint. The same guy looked as clumsy as a 2 year old dancing ballet with a 25 pound weight tied to his head if you handed him the ball and told him to score. Dennis Rodman was another like this.

    Quote Originally Posted by IceCold48 View Post
    I disagree. Luke is top 5 beating him would put Machida right back into contention. He had a horrible gameplan against Weidman, I'd be nervous to see a rematch as a Weidman fan if Machida was the aggressor the from the get go like he was in the championship rounds.
    Quote Originally Posted by CtGreat View Post
    Machida will never wear UFC gold again. He wont be ultra aggressive, because that simply isnt his style. Old dogs rarely learn new tricks
    What Machida has going for him is quick reflexes, awesome defensive footwork and a great ability to spot openings when an opponent is attacking. The man is perfectly designed to fight the way he does - as a defensive counterstriker.

    The talents he has would be far less useful if he had a more take it to 'em style. He may have talents that haven't been displayed, but given what he's shown I think he'd be foolish to try and shift from almost pure defense to pure offense.

    Take the fight against Weidman - Weidman's bigger, stronger and hits harder. He has great takedowns and is good at keeping someone down and doing damage. Unless Machida's got something really special we haven't seen that he can pull out (like a Dan Henderson right hand), giving up all the advantages he has over Weidman by changing his style totally would be a very stupid game plan.

  3. #23
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    Waiting until you are 3 rounds down against an opponent who has never lost, let alone been finished, before you change your approach is also a very stupid game plan.

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    I'm gonna have to disagree here with saying Machida wont wear gold again and you cannot teach an OLD MMA Dog new tricks. I personally feel Lyoto did learn from that Weidman fight and he may indeed be more aggressive in the future, he literally only lost that fight because he played it to damn safe and was on the defensive instead of attacking, sure he probably would of still lost the decision at that point but his game plan was not very good at all.

    Lyoto has been very successful by being a counter striker and making his opponents make mistakes before taking advantage, his opponents nowadays are different such as Chris Weidman, you HAVE to beat them not wait for them to beat themselves. I think it's a bit premature to say Machida is done and over with on the decline, but yeah he's getting old and well passed his prime that is very true.

    I think Machida handles Luke Rockhold and then him vs Jacare(I'm pretty confident he will beat Mousasi) for #1 contender would be awesome. That's just the way I see it
    "I leave this as a declaration of intent, so no one will get confused. 1: Si vis pacum para bellum. Latin. If you want peace, prepare for war. 2: Frank Castle is dead. He died with his family. 3: In certain extreme situations, the law is inadequate. In order to shame its inadequacies, it is necessary to act outside the law. To pursue natural justice. This isn't vengeance. Revenge is not a valid motive, it's an emotional response. No, not vengeance. Punishment "

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    Quote Originally Posted by LordCC View Post
    Waiting until you are 3 rounds down against an opponent who has never lost, let alone been finished, before you change your approach is also a very stupid game plan.
    True enough, but it's like saying that clowning was a stupid game plan for Silva against Weidman. In retrospect it's obvious, but both have had major success by waiting for a frustrated opponent to open himself up and make a mistake. Weidman just didn't oblige either...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam12six View Post
    True enough, but it's like saying that clowning was a stupid game plan for Silva against Weidman. In retrospect it's obvious, but both have had major success by waiting for a frustrated opponent to open himself up and make a mistake. Weidman just didn't oblige either...
    I predicted exactly what would happen in the Weidman fight because there is a precedent for it and Machida has lost that way before. It wasn't a one off like Silva getting KO'd, it is his Achilles heel that against top competition he is only likely to win by finishing because his style is too passive to win a decision.

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    The problem with Machida is that he did not learned from the Rampage and Davies loses.
    He lost 2 rounds and finally reacted in the third one, and obviously it was too late.

    And he kinda does the same thing now, he waits way too much before finally attacking. The "Machida puzzle" is not impossible anymore to solve so he can not just defend the whole time waiting for a successful counter.
    Not only brazilians can do this stuff


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    Quote Originally Posted by LordCC View Post
    I predicted exactly what would happen in the Weidman fight because there is a precedent for it and Machida has lost that way before. It wasn't a one off like Silva getting KO'd, it is his Achilles heel that against top competition he is only likely to win by finishing because his style is too passive to win a decision.
    I agree. I also think Machida has the ability to evolve his game. I just doubt that he'd be very good if that game evolved into the "throw caution to the wind" action we saw in the last round of the Weidman fight because I don't think he has the physical tools to overwhelm a top level opponent who's set to counter him.

    For fighters who refuse to run headfirst into the meatgrinder like Bader, Machida's best bet is probably to go with a style somewhat like Bisping - pecking away and picking up points while still waiting for that foolish mistake he can capitalize on.

    Unless there's a finish, if things are relatively even and one guy spends the whole fight walking forward and the other spends the fight walking backward, the guy walking forward is usually going to get the decision. For fighters who are too disciplined to rush into counters, Machida needs to pick up a way to win rounds.

    With his quicks and his kicks, Lyoto would see pretty good success doing nothing but leg kicking until pain and frustration forced his opponent to take a chance. Someone should sit him down and make him watch a bunch of old Ernesto Hoost fights to see what a dedication to leg kicks can accomplish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam12six View Post
    True, but now that we've seen what BJ's idea of evolving is, he probably did himself a favor by remaining stagnant - at least it was a high quality stagnation.
    Oh for sure it was just an example of an old dog learning new tricks really. A lot of it is the matter of mindset for most of these guys. Hard to break old habits and think what has always worked in the past needs to be changed.

    He may not be capable. Some people are just far more comfortable being defensive than offensive. Different sport, but same principle: Dikembe Mutombo was super quick and smooth when an opponent was driving into his paint. The same guy looked as clumsy as a 2 year old dancing ballet with a 25 pound weight tied to his head if you handed him the ball and told him to score. Dennis Rodman was another like this.
    I don't think he is really capable of it mentally and I understand that mindset I typically always play defensively first no matter the sport I'm playing. I think Machida's next fight will be a true sign if he is ever going to evolve past the fast counter striker. Hopefully the Rockhold match happens as this will be a good test of how/if he adjusts his gameplan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rise View Post
    Oh for sure it was just an example of an old dog learning new tricks really. A lot of it is the matter of mindset for most of these guys. Hard to break old habits and think what has always worked in the past needs to be changed.
    It's the nature of the beast and one of the things that make MMA intriguing. You've got the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" concept that is true. BJ was a beast at lightweight until Edgar came along. Matt Hughes was unstoppable until some Canadian Frenchman showed up who could stop him. That sort of thing is when we see if a fighter can grow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rise View Post
    I don't think he is really capable of it mentally and I understand that mindset I typically always play defensively first no matter the sport I'm playing. I think Machida's next fight will be a true sign if he is ever going to evolve past the fast counter striker. Hopefully the Rockhold match happens as this will be a good test of how/if he adjusts his gameplan.
    Like I said, I don't think Machida could or should try an all-out offense style. With his speed and footwork, though, if he'd learn to pick up points and do some damage from range while he looks for counter opportunities (instead of just backpedaling and hoping the other guy gets impatient) he'd be a terror. While I wouldn't bet on his developing in that direction, it would be pretty awesome to see.

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